• Claude Muncaster (1903-1974) Farmstead and Trees

    Dated Sept 1921 Signed on reverse with additional sketches of figures Watercolour 22x28cm Claude Grahame Muncaster, RWS, ROI, RBA, SMA was the son of Oliver Hall RA. At the age of fifteen his career as a landscape painter began, and he soon took to the seas, spending the 1920s and 30s travelling the world with his sketchbook in a series of vessels. With the outbreak of war and he joined the RNVR training as a navigator. Having left school at fifteen his mathematics was very weak and it was a relief for all when his artistic talents meant he was recruited as a camofleur. A master of capturing seascapes he was therefore able to hide huge ships ‘in plain sight’ with clever disguises. After the war he painted for the Royal Family and was a frequent guest at Sandringham. Claude Muncaster was a watercolourist known for his landscapes and maritime scenes. He was born Grahame Hall, the son of the Royal Academician Oliver Hall who taught his son to paint from an early age; Grahame first exhibited his work aged 15 and a few years later was showing at the RA. However, he adopted the name Claude Muncaster in 1922 to dissociate his career from that of his father. Muncaster’s primary choice of subject matter came from a genuine love of the sea. He made several long-distance sea voyages, including one around the Horn as a deckhand in the windjammer Olivebank in 1931, which he described in ‘Rolling Round the Horn’, published in 1933. Armed with a sketchbook, his aim was to be able to ‘paint ships and the sea with greater authority’. This he certainly achieved, perfectly capturing the limpid first light of morning over the Port of Aden, the choppy rain-grey waters of the Bay of Biscay and a streak of sunlight through gathering storm clouds at dusk in Exeter. He became an Associate of the Royal Watercolour Society in 1931 and was a founder member, and later President, of the Royal Society of Marine Artists. During the Second World War, Muncaster served in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (RNVR) from 1940-44, training as a navigator before going on to advise on the camouflage of ships, and also worked as an official war artist. In ‘Still Morning at Aden’ (1944) he depicts Allied warships in this safe anchorage in the Middle East; the back is stamped with Admiralty approval. In 1946-7 he was commissioned by the Queen to produce watercolours of the royal residences at Windsor, Sandringham and Balmoral; the Duke of Edinburgh, in a foreword to a biography of Muncaster, recalls looking at these and considering the artist’s ‘unerring instinct for a subject’, his sense of atmosphere. Other commissions included large panoramas of the Thames and of Bradford. His career also included work as an etcher, illustrator, writer, lecturer and broadcaster, and his paintings can be found in the Royal Academy, Tate, National Maritime Museum Cornwall, National Railway Museum and Royal Air Force Museum. Condition: generally good, few isolated spots to sky as can be seen in the magnified version of the picture. If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.
  • Claude Muncaster (1903-1974) Near Mundesley, Norfolk

    Dated 1930 Signed Watercolour 22x28cm Muncaster's watercolours capture the English countryside feel with great competence Claude Grahame Muncaster, RWS, ROI, RBA, SMA was the son of Oliver Hall RA. At the age of fifteen his career as a landscape painter began, and he soon took to the seas, spending the 1920s and 30s travelling the world with his sketchbook in a series of vessels. With the outbreak of war and he joined the RNVR training as a navigator. Having left school at fifteen his mathematics was very weak and it was a relief for all when his artistic talents meant he was recruited as a camofleur. A master of capturing seascapes he was therefore able to hide huge ships ‘in plain sight’ with clever disguises. After the war he painted for the Royal Family and was a frequent guest at Sandringham. Claude Muncaster was a watercolourist known for his landscapes and maritime scenes. He was born Grahame Hall, the son of the Royal Academician Oliver Hall who taught his son to paint from an early age; Grahame first exhibited his work aged 15 and a few years later was showing at the RA. However, he adopted the name Claude Muncaster in 1922 to dissociate his career from that of his father. Muncaster’s primary choice of subject matter came from a genuine love of the sea. He made several long-distance sea voyages, including one around the Horn as a deckhand in the windjammer Olivebank in 1931, which he described in ‘Rolling Round the Horn’, published in 1933. Armed with a sketchbook, his aim was to be able to ‘paint ships and the sea with greater authority’. This he certainly achieved, perfectly capturing the limpid first light of morning over the Port of Aden, the choppy rain-grey waters of the Bay of Biscay and a streak of sunlight through gathering storm clouds at dusk in Exeter. He became an Associate of the Royal Watercolour Society in 1931 and was a founder member, and later President, of the Royal Society of Marine Artists. During the Second World War, Muncaster served in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (RNVR) from 1940-44, training as a navigator before going on to advise on the camouflage of ships, and also worked as an official war artist. In ‘Still Morning at Aden’ (1944) he depicts Allied warships in this safe anchorage in the Middle East; the back is stamped with Admiralty approval. In 1946-7 he was commissioned by the Queen to produce watercolours of the royal residences at Windsor, Sandringham and Balmoral; the Duke of Edinburgh, in a foreword to a biography of Muncaster, recalls looking at these and considering the artist’s ‘unerring instinct for a subject’, his sense of atmosphere. Other commissions included large panoramas of the Thames and of Bradford. His career also included work as an etcher, illustrator, writer, lecturer and broadcaster, and his paintings can be found in the Royal Academy, Tate, National Maritime Museum Cornwall, National Railway Museum and Royal Air Force Museum. If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.
  • Anonymous

    Gondola with Venetian Cityscape, Venice, Italy

    From a series of seven images of Venice, click here to see the others. Probably c. 1900 Pen, pencil and ink drawing On gilt-edged artist’s board from an album. Whilst unattributed, these are by a skilled hand in a gloriously ‘loose’ style. They have the air of maybe Thomas Matthews Rourke, Ruskin’s assistant. Venice was a regular stopping point on the Grand Tour, and the romance and exotic nature is here captured skilfully by the artist with a clever use of ink wash. The New York Times in 2008 described the Grand Tour thus: “Three hundred years ago, wealthy young Englishmen began taking a post-Oxbridge trek through France and Italy in search of art, culture and the roots of Western civilization. With nearly unlimited funds, aristocratic connections and months (or years) to roam, they commissioned paintings, perfected their language skills and mingled with the upper crust of the Continent.” Venice Railway Station opened in 1861, so by the time of these views the expedition as far as Venice was somewhat easier. Condition: Possible slight loss of colour and there is a little occasional spotting to the paper. Nonetheless a most charming drawing. If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.
  • Pre-Raphaelite School

    Sculpture of a Figure in a Niche, Venice, Italy

    From a series of seven images of Venice, click here to see the others. Probably c. 1900 Pen, pencil and ink drawing On gilt-edged artist’s board from an album. Whilst unattributed, these are by a skilled hand in a gloriously ‘loose’ style. They have the air of maybe Thomas Matthews Rourke, Ruskin’s assistant. Venice was a regular stopping point on the Grand Tour, and the romance and exotic nature is here captured skilfully by the artist with a clever use of ink wash. The New York Times in 2008 described the Grand Tour thus: “Three hundred years ago, wealthy young Englishmen began taking a post-Oxbridge trek through France and Italy in search of art, culture and the roots of Western civilization. With nearly unlimited funds, aristocratic connections and months (or years) to roam, they commissioned paintings, perfected their language skills and mingled with the upper crust of the Continent.” Venice Railway Station opened in 1861, so by the time of these views the expedition as far as Venice was somewhat easier. Condition: Possible slight loss of colour and there is a little occasional spotting to the paper. Nonetheless a most charming drawing. If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.
  • Pre-Raphaelite School

    Cityscape of Venice with Gondolas, Italy

    From a series of seven images of Venice  Probably c. 1900 Pen, pencil and ink drawing On gilt-edged artist's board from an album. Whilst unattributed, these are by a skilled hand in a gloriously 'loose' style. They have the air of maybe Thomas Matthews Rourke, Ruskin's assistant. Venice was a regular stopping point on the Grand Tour, and the romance and exotic nature is here captured skilfully by the artist with a clever use of ink wash. The New York Times in 2008 described the Grand Tour thus: "Three hundred years ago, wealthy young Englishmen began taking a post-Oxbridge trek through France and Italy in search of art, culture and the roots of Western civilization. With nearly unlimited funds, aristocratic connections and months (or years) to roam, they commissioned paintings, perfected their language skills and mingled with the upper crust of the Continent." Venice Railway Station opened in 1861, so by the time of these views the expedition as far as Venice was somewhat easier. Condition: Possible slight loss of colour and there is a little occasional spotting to the paper. Nonetheless a most charming drawing. If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.
  • Pre-Raphaelite School

    Gondola with Rialto Bridge, Venice, Italy

    From a series of seven images of Venice, click here to see the others. Probably c. 1900 Pen, pencil and ink drawing On gilt-edged artist’s board from an album. Whilst unattributed, these are by a skilled hand in a gloriously ‘loose’ style. They have the air of maybe Thomas Matthews Rourke, Ruskin’s assistant. Venice was a regular stopping point on the Grand Tour, and the romance and exotic nature is here captured skilfully by the artist with a clever use of ink wash. The New York Times in 2008 described the Grand Tour thus: “Three hundred years ago, wealthy young Englishmen began taking a post-Oxbridge trek through France and Italy in search of art, culture and the roots of Western civilization. With nearly unlimited funds, aristocratic connections and months (or years) to roam, they commissioned paintings, perfected their language skills and mingled with the upper crust of the Continent.” Venice Railway Station opened in 1861, so by the time of these views the expedition as far as Venice was somewhat easier. Condition: Possible slight loss of colour and there is a little occasional spotting to the paper. Nonetheless a most charming drawing. If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.
  • Pre-Raphaelite School

    Column of Saint Theodore, Piazza San Marco, Venice, Italy

    From a series of seven images of Venice, click here to see the others. Probably c. 1900 Pen, pencil and ink drawing On gilt-edged artist’s board from an album. Whilst unattributed, these are by a skilled hand in a gloriously ‘loose’ style. They have the air of maybe Thomas Matthews Rourke, Ruskin’s assistant. Venice was a regular stopping point on the Grand Tour, and the romance and exotic nature is here captured skilfully by the artist with a clever use of ink wash. The New York Times in 2008 described the Grand Tour thus: “Three hundred years ago, wealthy young Englishmen began taking a post-Oxbridge trek through France and Italy in search of art, culture and the roots of Western civilization. With nearly unlimited funds, aristocratic connections and months (or years) to roam, they commissioned paintings, perfected their language skills and mingled with the upper crust of the Continent.” Venice Railway Station opened in 1861, so by the time of these views the expedition as far as Venice was somewhat easier. Condition: Possible slight loss of colour and there is a little occasional spotting to the paper. Nonetheless a most charming drawing. If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.
  • Pre-Raphaelite School

    Column of St Mark (Lion), Piazza San Marco, Venice, Italy

    From a series of seven images of Venice  Probably c. 1900 Pen, pencil and ink drawing On gilt-edged artist's board from an album. Whilst unattributed, these are by a skilled hand in a gloriously 'loose' style. They have the air of maybe Thomas Matthews Rourke, Ruskin's assistant. Venice was a regular stopping point on the Grand Tour, and the romance and exotic nature is here captured skilfully by the artist with a clever use of ink wash. The New York Times in 2008 described the Grand Tour thus: "Three hundred years ago, wealthy young Englishmen began taking a post-Oxbridge trek through France and Italy in search of art, culture and the roots of Western civilization. With nearly unlimited funds, aristocratic connections and months (or years) to roam, they commissioned paintings, perfected their language skills and mingled with the upper crust of the Continent." Venice Railway Station opened in 1861, so by the time of these views the expedition as far as Venice was somewhat easier. Condition: Possible slight loss of colour and there is a little occasional spotting to the paper. Nonetheless a most charming drawing. If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.
  • Anonymous

    Columns of St. Theodore & St. Mark, Piazza San Marco, Venice, Italy

    From a series of seven images of Venice  Probably c. 1900 Pen, pencil and ink drawing On gilt-edged artist’s board from an album. Whilst unattributed, these are by a skilled hand in a gloriously ‘loose’ style. They have the air of maybe Thomas Matthews Rourke, Ruskin’s assistant. Venice was a regular stopping point on the Grand Tour, and the romance and exotic nature is here captured skilfully by the artist with a clever use of ink wash. The New York Times in 2008 described the Grand Tour thus: “Three hundred years ago, wealthy young Englishmen began taking a post-Oxbridge trek through France and Italy in search of art, culture and the roots of Western civilization. With nearly unlimited funds, aristocratic connections and months (or years) to roam, they commissioned paintings, perfected their language skills and mingled with the upper crust of the Continent.” Venice Railway Station opened in 1861, so by the time of these views the expedition as far as Venice was somewhat easier. Condition: Possible slight loss of colour and there is a little occasional spotting to the paper. Nonetheless a most charming drawing. If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.
  • Frederick Nash (1782-1856) Drawn and etched

    Engraved by F C Lewis

    South East View of St George's Chapel, Windsor

    To the Right Reverend the Lord Bishop of Exeter London Published by F Nash, No 6 Asylum Buildings, Westminster Road July 12 1804 39.5x52cm Frederick Nash was born in Lambeth. Initially studying architectural drawing under Thomas Malton he subsequently enrolled at the Royal Academy of Arts. From 1801 to 1809 he worked with the antiquarians John Britton and Edward Wedlake Brayley, subsequently becoming a member of the Society of Painters in Watercolours - a group of painters who had left the Royal Academy following complaints of under-recognition of their works. Latterly primarily a landscape painter he toured the rivers of Germany.
  • Frederick Nash (1782-1856) Drawn and etched

    Engraved by F C Lewis

    South West View of St George's Chapel, Windsor

    To the Right Reverend the Lord Bishop of Exeter London Published by F Nash, No 6 Asylum Buildings, Westminster Road July 12 1804 39.5x52cm Frederick Nash was born in Lambeth. Initially studying architectural drawing under Thomas Malton he subsequently enrolled at the Royal Academy of Arts. From 1801 to 1809 he worked with the antiquarians John Britton and Edward Wedlake Brayley, subsequently becoming a member of the Society of Painters in Watercolours - a group of painters who had left the Royal Academy following complaints of under-recognition of their works. Latterly primarily a landscape painter he toured the rivers of Germany.
  • Out of stock

    Macadam (British fl. 1920s-30s)

    Giants Bread Original Book Cover Design

    (written by 'Mary Westmacott' pseudonym of Agatha Christie) Watercolour and pencil 37.5x25cm Agatha Christie wrote a series of books under the nom de plume of Mary Westmacott. Macadam was a British illustrator active in the 1920s and 1930s. Amongst his commercial works are several dust wrapper designs for London-based publishers, most important amongst which is the design for the dust wrapper for the first edition of Agatha Christie's first straight novel Giant's Bread. Book dust wrapper designs Amongst his known works are: Giant's Bread by Mary Westmacott, a nom-de-plume of Agatha Christie (1930) Collins, London - first edition. Joseph Kerkhoven's Third Existence by Jacob Wassermann (1934) Allen & Unwin, London - dust wrapper for first UK edition. Neighbours by George Thomas (1935) Williams & Norgate, Ltd., London. The Barbarians by Virginia Faulkner (1935) Arthur Baker, London. Blind Mouths by Thomas Frederic Tweed (1934) Arthur Barker, London - dust wrapper for first edition. Humour by Stephen Leacock (1935) The Bodley Head, London - dust wrapper for first edition. Water into Wine by Catherine Carter. Not all his dust wrappers are signed, but those for Blind Mouths and Joseph Kerkhoven's Third Existence are.
  • Robert Morden (1650-1703) Nottingham Shire (or Nottinghamshire)

    Engraving with recent hand colouring 34x42cm First published in 1695 for Camden's Britannica (1695-1772) and reprinted several times during the succeeding century.
  • David Loggan (1634-1692)

    Frontispiece Public Schools Engraving 33x42cm If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.
  • Colen Campbell (1676-1729)

    Althrop Hall in Northamptonshire the Seat of the Rt Honourable The Earl of Sunderland & co.

    35x50cm Engraving (1715-1725) from 'Vitruvius Britannicus, or the British Architect...' Althorp Hall - as it is now written, but still pronounced 'Althrop' - is the seat of the Earl Spencer and the location of the grave of Diana, Princess of Wales. Colen Campbell was a Scottish architect and architectural writer, renowned for being a founder of the Georgian style. His major published work was 'Vitruvius Britannicus' which was a catalogue of design, containing a series of engravings of English buildings by Inigo Jones, Sir Christopher Wren, Campbell himself and other prominent architects of the era. It was published in three volumes between 1715 and 1725.
  • Robert Bonfils (French: 1886-1972)

    Designs for scarf for Bianchini Ferrier Bull Fighting 31x15cm Gouache and pencil Provenance: Christies, 25-27 July 2001 Bianchini Textiles sale Born in Paris, Bonfils spent between 1903-1909 at various Parisian art schools: the École Germain Pilon, the École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs (where he subsequently taught for thirty-two years), and the École des Beaux Arts. From 1909 he exhibited regularly at the Salon d'Automne, by 1912 he was exhibiting at Salon des Artistes Décorateurs and then subsequently at Tuileries and abroad. He was an organiser of the 1925 Paris International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts, and the 1937 Exposition. His relationship with Bianchini commenced in 1915 who produced many of his textile designs. He was made Chevalier de la Légion d'honneur in 1926, being promoted to Officier in 1938.