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  • Sale!

    'Samivel' Paul Gayet-Tancrède

    Objectives of the Kathmandu Declaration

    c.1980 Original Lithographic Poster 80x60cm Samivel was a writer, an artist, a photographer, an explorer and more. In 1948 he accompanied Paul Émile Victor on the first French Greenland expedition, making three documentary films in the process. His friends included Théodore Monod and Gilbert André - the latter the mayor of Bonneval-sur-Arc and one of the founders of the Vanoise National Park - and with them and others he spent his whole life aiming for the protection of the imperilled countryside. The graphic artist side of him had a life-long fascination with high mountains, and his illustrated books and series of posters of the French Alps have long been popular. If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.
  • Sale!

    'Samivel' Paul Gayet-Tancrède (1907-1992) Samivel -The Poet of the Word and the Image, An exhibition: "At the true summit" (1992)

    Created as part of an exhibition located Maison Stendhal in Grenoble in 1992/1993 Original Lithographic Poster 99x65cm Samivel was a writer, an artist, a photographer, an explorer and more. In 1948 he accompanied Paul Émile Victor on the first French Greenland expedition, making three documentary films in the process. His friends included Théodore Monod and Gilbert André - the latter the mayor of Bonneval-sur-Arc and one of the founders of the Vanoise National Park - and with them and others he spent his whole life aiming for the protection of the imperilled countryside. The graphic artist side of him had a life-long fascination with high mountains, and his illustrated books and series of posters of the French Alps have long been popular. If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.
  • Anonymous Original Art Deco Design for Poster: Norwegian Cruises by Blue Star Luxury Line

    Gouache on paper c. 1930s 35x25cm It has not yet been possible to identify a poster for which this was the design. A well-painted design for a poster for cruises to Norway. A funnel pours out a stylised stream of smoke. The distance in the fjord is cleverly demarkated by the use of horizontal white lines. The interlocking spurs of the fjord are clearly visible, and a spectacular use of colour helps the Art Deco design. Isolated spotting and loss of paint, as visible in photograph. In a fine hand-finished black box frame, with AR anti-reflective glass. A rare survivor which shows very handsomely.
  • Bovril Poster Which are the Best Bovril Posters?

    To Help the Veterans' Association Buy a Ticket in the Great Competition Over $140,000 (£30,000) in Prizes Tickets $1.20 each from the Veterans' Association 2725 Park Avenue, Montreal or any authorised Depot 76 x 51cm Original Vintage Poster Mid Twentieth Century
  • Claude Muncaster (1903-1974) Farmstead and Trees

    Dated Sept 1921 Signed on reverse with additional sketches of figures Watercolour 22x28cm Claude Grahame Muncaster, RWS, ROI, RBA, SMA was the son of Oliver Hall RA. At the age of fifteen his career as a landscape painter began, and he soon took to the seas, spending the 1920s and 30s travelling the world with his sketchbook in a series of vessels. With the outbreak of war and he joined the RNVR training as a navigator. Having left school at fifteen his mathematics was very weak and it was a relief for all when his artistic talents meant he was recruited as a camofleur. A master of capturing seascapes he was therefore able to hide huge ships ‘in plain sight’ with clever disguises. After the war he painted for the Royal Family and was a frequent guest at Sandringham. Claude Muncaster was a watercolourist known for his landscapes and maritime scenes. He was born Grahame Hall, the son of the Royal Academician Oliver Hall who taught his son to paint from an early age; Grahame first exhibited his work aged 15 and a few years later was showing at the RA. However, he adopted the name Claude Muncaster in 1922 to dissociate his career from that of his father. Muncaster’s primary choice of subject matter came from a genuine love of the sea. He made several long-distance sea voyages, including one around the Horn as a deckhand in the windjammer Olivebank in 1931, which he described in ‘Rolling Round the Horn’, published in 1933. Armed with a sketchbook, his aim was to be able to ‘paint ships and the sea with greater authority’. This he certainly achieved, perfectly capturing the limpid first light of morning over the Port of Aden, the choppy rain-grey waters of the Bay of Biscay and a streak of sunlight through gathering storm clouds at dusk in Exeter. He became an Associate of the Royal Watercolour Society in 1931 and was a founder member, and later President, of the Royal Society of Marine Artists. During the Second World War, Muncaster served in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (RNVR) from 1940-44, training as a navigator before going on to advise on the camouflage of ships, and also worked as an official war artist. In ‘Still Morning at Aden’ (1944) he depicts Allied warships in this safe anchorage in the Middle East; the back is stamped with Admiralty approval. In 1946-7 he was commissioned by the Queen to produce watercolours of the royal residences at Windsor, Sandringham and Balmoral; the Duke of Edinburgh, in a foreword to a biography of Muncaster, recalls looking at these and considering the artist’s ‘unerring instinct for a subject’, his sense of atmosphere. Other commissions included large panoramas of the Thames and of Bradford. His career also included work as an etcher, illustrator, writer, lecturer and broadcaster, and his paintings can be found in the Royal Academy, Tate, National Maritime Museum Cornwall, National Railway Museum and Royal Air Force Museum. Condition: generally good, few isolated spots to sky as can be seen in the magnified version of the picture. If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.
  • Claude Muncaster (1903-1974) Factory Scene

    Monochrome aquatint Signed in plate 22x28cm Provenance: the family of the artist, by descent. Click here for more from the same source. Aquatint is an unusual medium for Muncaster - the renowned watercolourist - and an unusual subject. Here he has handled the factory scene with perhaps more even than his usual skill. The smoke makes dramatic courses across the sky, and the wires, roofs and gantries all bring very strong triangular forms to a scene with powerful vertical lines. Claude Grahame Muncaster, RWS, ROI, RBA, SMA was the son of Oliver Hall RA. At the age of fifteen his career as a landscape painter began, and he soon took to the seas, spending the 1920s and 30s travelling the world with his sketchbook in a series of vessels. With the outbreak of war and he joined the RNVR training as a navigator. Having left school at fifteen his mathematics was very weak and it was a relief for all when his artistic talents meant he was recruited as a camofleur. A master of capturing seascapes he was therefore able to hide huge ships ‘in plain sight’ with clever disguises. After the war he painted for the Royal Family and was a frequent guest at Sandringham. Claude Muncaster was a watercolourist known for his landscapes and maritime scenes. He was born Grahame Hall, the son of the Royal Academician Oliver Hall who taught his son to paint from an early age; Grahame first exhibited his work aged 15 and a few years later was showing at the RA. However, he adopted the name Claude Muncaster in 1922 to dissociate his career from that of his father. Muncaster’s primary choice of subject matter came from a genuine love of the sea. He made several long-distance sea voyages, including one around the Horn as a deckhand in the windjammer Olivebank in 1931, which he described in ‘Rolling Round the Horn’, published in 1933. Armed with a sketchbook, his aim was to be able to ‘paint ships and the sea with greater authority’. This he certainly achieved, perfectly capturing the limpid first light of morning over the Port of Aden, the choppy rain-grey waters of the Bay of Biscay and a streak of sunlight through gathering storm clouds at dusk in Exeter. He became an Associate of the Royal Watercolour Society in 1931 and was a founder member, and later President, of the Royal Society of Marine Artists. During the Second World War, Muncaster served in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (RNVR) from 1940-44, training as a navigator before going on to advise on the camouflage of ships, and also worked as an official war artist. In ‘Still Morning at Aden’ (1944) he depicts Allied warships in this safe anchorage in the Middle East; the back is stamped with Admiralty approval. In 1946-7 he was commissioned by the Queen to produce watercolours of the royal residences at Windsor, Sandringham and Balmoral; the Duke of Edinburgh, in a foreword to a biography of Muncaster, recalls looking at these and considering the artist’s ‘unerring instinct for a subject’, his sense of atmosphere. Other commissions included large panoramas of the Thames and of Bradford. His career also included work as an etcher, illustrator, writer, lecturer and broadcaster, and his paintings can be found in the Royal Academy, Tate, National Maritime Museum Cornwall, National Railway Museum and Royal Air Force Museum.
  • Claude Muncaster (1903-1974) Near Mundesley, Norfolk

    Dated 1930 Signed Watercolour 22x28cm Muncaster's watercolours capture the English countryside feel with great competence Claude Grahame Muncaster, RWS, ROI, RBA, SMA was the son of Oliver Hall RA. At the age of fifteen his career as a landscape painter began, and he soon took to the seas, spending the 1920s and 30s travelling the world with his sketchbook in a series of vessels. With the outbreak of war and he joined the RNVR training as a navigator. Having left school at fifteen his mathematics was very weak and it was a relief for all when his artistic talents meant he was recruited as a camofleur. A master of capturing seascapes he was therefore able to hide huge ships ‘in plain sight’ with clever disguises. After the war he painted for the Royal Family and was a frequent guest at Sandringham. Claude Muncaster was a watercolourist known for his landscapes and maritime scenes. He was born Grahame Hall, the son of the Royal Academician Oliver Hall who taught his son to paint from an early age; Grahame first exhibited his work aged 15 and a few years later was showing at the RA. However, he adopted the name Claude Muncaster in 1922 to dissociate his career from that of his father. Muncaster’s primary choice of subject matter came from a genuine love of the sea. He made several long-distance sea voyages, including one around the Horn as a deckhand in the windjammer Olivebank in 1931, which he described in ‘Rolling Round the Horn’, published in 1933. Armed with a sketchbook, his aim was to be able to ‘paint ships and the sea with greater authority’. This he certainly achieved, perfectly capturing the limpid first light of morning over the Port of Aden, the choppy rain-grey waters of the Bay of Biscay and a streak of sunlight through gathering storm clouds at dusk in Exeter. He became an Associate of the Royal Watercolour Society in 1931 and was a founder member, and later President, of the Royal Society of Marine Artists. During the Second World War, Muncaster served in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (RNVR) from 1940-44, training as a navigator before going on to advise on the camouflage of ships, and also worked as an official war artist. In ‘Still Morning at Aden’ (1944) he depicts Allied warships in this safe anchorage in the Middle East; the back is stamped with Admiralty approval. In 1946-7 he was commissioned by the Queen to produce watercolours of the royal residences at Windsor, Sandringham and Balmoral; the Duke of Edinburgh, in a foreword to a biography of Muncaster, recalls looking at these and considering the artist’s ‘unerring instinct for a subject’, his sense of atmosphere. Other commissions included large panoramas of the Thames and of Bradford. His career also included work as an etcher, illustrator, writer, lecturer and broadcaster, and his paintings can be found in the Royal Academy, Tate, National Maritime Museum Cornwall, National Railway Museum and Royal Air Force Museum. If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.
  • Elijah Albert Cox

    Pageant of London (1926)

    Original London Transport Underground poster
    Lithograph
    102 x 127 cm
    If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.
  • George Horace Davis (1888-1963) Design for publication probably in The Illustrated London News

    Tractors and mechanisation Signed and dated 1947 Gouache, monochrome 17.25x29.75" Here the reduction in manpower as a result of the mechanisation of agriculture is celebrated in a typical work by Davis. A "special artist" for 'The Illustrated London News', he worked for it for forty years, the scope and detail of his work being without peer in the rest of the staff. Tractors are pictured in every possible role in agriculture; however the great advances made in the sixty years since then could not have been forseen. Born in Kensington, London, Davis was educated at Kensington Park College and then at Ealing School of Art, working subsequently as a freelance artist until the First World War intervened. He served with the Royal Flying Corps (subsequently the Royal Air Force) with distinction, and had a number of his paintings of aerial combat published in 'The Sphere.' In 1923 he commenced work with The Illustrated London News, for which he worked for the next forty years. His first drawing related to the use, in small boats, of wireless and was the first of many similar diagrammatic drawings designed to educate and inform readers of advances in science, warfare, technology or transport. Needless to say his attention to detail meant architectural drawings were another strength of his, drawings of 10 Downing Street and Westminster Abbey, for instance - and also architectural phantasies such as a proposed heliport at Charing Cross Station. During his career at The Illustrated London News he is estimated to have produced illustrations covering some 2,500 pages of the publication; each one requiring an informed understanding arising from careful research. He continued to work for it until his eighties and at the time of his death there was a supply of finished but as-yet-unpublished works. The sale at Christies in London of the archive of The Illustrated London News on 7 October 2014 included many works by Davis - a price of £16,875 being obtained for a series of seven drawings by him.
  • Julian Trevelyan (1910-1988)

    Kensington Gardens (1969)

    Etching and aquatint, signed, numbered 55/75 35x48cm Click here for biographical details and other works by the artist. If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.
  • Peter Collins ARCA (1923-2001) Still Life with Green Apples and Bottle

    Oil on Board 49x59cm Provenance: The Artist's Studio A stongly-painted image, with a generous use of skilfully executed impasto and bright tones. A bowl of green fruit, probably apples, and with perhaps some lemons sits besides a slender and partly-drunk bottle, with an abstract tablecloth in red, white and blue behind. Collins's first job was at an advertising agency, in the commercial studio, whilst he attended evening art classes. World War II interrupted his career and he joined the Royal Artillery (of the British Army), teaching painting and drawing in the Education Corps - whilst simultaneously teaching at St Martin's School of Art, part time. Following the war Collins studied at the Royal College of Art, winning a scholarship. Leaving in 1950 he then worked as a commercial artist producing some well-known posters for clients including British Railways and British European Airways. He was the Art Director at Odhams Press and spent time designing for both ICI and Shell. With his wife Georgette he created the 'Bacombe Galleries' in Sussex, converting a group of buildings. In 1975 they again converted buildings, this time Stanley Studios in Chelsea which were scheduled for redevelopment; many artists had worked there, probably the most famous being Elizabeth Frink. Combining an artist's studio and a single residence at Stanley Studios the Collinses were immersed in Chelsea's art scene and proceeded to fill the place with art, antiques, scupture and curios.
  • Anonymous

    Gondola with Venetian Cityscape, Venice, Italy

    From a series of seven images of Venice, click here to see the others. Probably c. 1900 Pen, pencil and ink drawing On gilt-edged artist’s board from an album. Whilst unattributed, these are by a skilled hand in a gloriously ‘loose’ style. They have the air of maybe Thomas Matthews Rourke, Ruskin’s assistant. Venice was a regular stopping point on the Grand Tour, and the romance and exotic nature is here captured skilfully by the artist with a clever use of ink wash. The New York Times in 2008 described the Grand Tour thus: “Three hundred years ago, wealthy young Englishmen began taking a post-Oxbridge trek through France and Italy in search of art, culture and the roots of Western civilization. With nearly unlimited funds, aristocratic connections and months (or years) to roam, they commissioned paintings, perfected their language skills and mingled with the upper crust of the Continent.” Venice Railway Station opened in 1861, so by the time of these views the expedition as far as Venice was somewhat easier. Condition: Possible slight loss of colour and there is a little occasional spotting to the paper. Nonetheless a most charming drawing. If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.
  • Pre-Raphaelite School

    Sculpture of a Figure in a Niche, Venice, Italy

    From a series of seven images of Venice, click here to see the others. Probably c. 1900 Pen, pencil and ink drawing On gilt-edged artist’s board from an album. Whilst unattributed, these are by a skilled hand in a gloriously ‘loose’ style. They have the air of maybe Thomas Matthews Rourke, Ruskin’s assistant. Venice was a regular stopping point on the Grand Tour, and the romance and exotic nature is here captured skilfully by the artist with a clever use of ink wash. The New York Times in 2008 described the Grand Tour thus: “Three hundred years ago, wealthy young Englishmen began taking a post-Oxbridge trek through France and Italy in search of art, culture and the roots of Western civilization. With nearly unlimited funds, aristocratic connections and months (or years) to roam, they commissioned paintings, perfected their language skills and mingled with the upper crust of the Continent.” Venice Railway Station opened in 1861, so by the time of these views the expedition as far as Venice was somewhat easier. Condition: Possible slight loss of colour and there is a little occasional spotting to the paper. Nonetheless a most charming drawing. If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.
  • Pre-Raphaelite School

    Cityscape of Venice with Gondolas, Italy

    From a series of seven images of Venice  Probably c. 1900 Pen, pencil and ink drawing On gilt-edged artist's board from an album. Whilst unattributed, these are by a skilled hand in a gloriously 'loose' style. They have the air of maybe Thomas Matthews Rourke, Ruskin's assistant. Venice was a regular stopping point on the Grand Tour, and the romance and exotic nature is here captured skilfully by the artist with a clever use of ink wash. The New York Times in 2008 described the Grand Tour thus: "Three hundred years ago, wealthy young Englishmen began taking a post-Oxbridge trek through France and Italy in search of art, culture and the roots of Western civilization. With nearly unlimited funds, aristocratic connections and months (or years) to roam, they commissioned paintings, perfected their language skills and mingled with the upper crust of the Continent." Venice Railway Station opened in 1861, so by the time of these views the expedition as far as Venice was somewhat easier. Condition: Possible slight loss of colour and there is a little occasional spotting to the paper. Nonetheless a most charming drawing. If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.
  • Pre-Raphaelite School

    Gondola with Rialto Bridge, Venice, Italy

    From a series of seven images of Venice, click here to see the others. Probably c. 1900 Pen, pencil and ink drawing On gilt-edged artist’s board from an album. Whilst unattributed, these are by a skilled hand in a gloriously ‘loose’ style. They have the air of maybe Thomas Matthews Rourke, Ruskin’s assistant. Venice was a regular stopping point on the Grand Tour, and the romance and exotic nature is here captured skilfully by the artist with a clever use of ink wash. The New York Times in 2008 described the Grand Tour thus: “Three hundred years ago, wealthy young Englishmen began taking a post-Oxbridge trek through France and Italy in search of art, culture and the roots of Western civilization. With nearly unlimited funds, aristocratic connections and months (or years) to roam, they commissioned paintings, perfected their language skills and mingled with the upper crust of the Continent.” Venice Railway Station opened in 1861, so by the time of these views the expedition as far as Venice was somewhat easier. Condition: Possible slight loss of colour and there is a little occasional spotting to the paper. Nonetheless a most charming drawing. If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.
  • Pre-Raphaelite School

    Column of Saint Theodore, Piazza San Marco, Venice, Italy

    From a series of seven images of Venice, click here to see the others. Probably c. 1900 Pen, pencil and ink drawing On gilt-edged artist’s board from an album. Whilst unattributed, these are by a skilled hand in a gloriously ‘loose’ style. They have the air of maybe Thomas Matthews Rourke, Ruskin’s assistant. Venice was a regular stopping point on the Grand Tour, and the romance and exotic nature is here captured skilfully by the artist with a clever use of ink wash. The New York Times in 2008 described the Grand Tour thus: “Three hundred years ago, wealthy young Englishmen began taking a post-Oxbridge trek through France and Italy in search of art, culture and the roots of Western civilization. With nearly unlimited funds, aristocratic connections and months (or years) to roam, they commissioned paintings, perfected their language skills and mingled with the upper crust of the Continent.” Venice Railway Station opened in 1861, so by the time of these views the expedition as far as Venice was somewhat easier. Condition: Possible slight loss of colour and there is a little occasional spotting to the paper. Nonetheless a most charming drawing. If you are interested email info@manningfineart.co.uk or call us on 07929 749056.